Study Guides (247,934)
Canada (121,177)
York University (10,191)
Humanities (404)
HUMA 1160 (44)
all (5)
Midterm

MODR LECTURE TEST.docx

22 Pages
76 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Humanities
Course
HUMA 1160
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Evaulauting Arguements 10/08/2013 When we are we make claims or assertions and back them up with reasons  ­there are 2 necessary components  ­a persuasive claim or assertion  ­at least one supporting reason Every Argument has 1. A conclusion the statement being supported, your persuasive claim, premises­  supporting reasons Truth: whether premises and conclusion correspond to the facts Validity: whether the conclusion follows from the premises. The conclusion of valid arguments are the  logical consequences of its premises Soundness: when the premises of an argument are true and the conclusion validly derived from them. Unsound arguments: Unsound arguments can use valid reasoning but are based on untrue premises  An unsound argument can have true premises but invalid reasoning is used to draw the conclusion: Sound Arguments  Sound arguments: use valid reasoning to reach the conclusion – Only sound arguments have both true premises & conclusions Necessity and Sufficiency ­when evaluating an argument you should ask yourself if the premises are necessarily true.  And if they are sufficient to prove the conclusion. That is, is there enough evidence  Almost all arguments have strengths and weaknesses: few are perfect and few  are unsalvageable ­it would be un­realistic to demand that an argument be proven beyond any doubt or criticism  ­when evaluating an argument we are concerned with validity and truth  ­ we are not interested in extra logical merits such as clarity, elegance, persuasiveness, or economy of  style, agrees with our opinion or if the argument is considered true.                              Fallacies  Fallacies are the illusion of a good argument. They have the power to fool you into thinking that you are  agreeing with an argument for good reasons when you are actually agreeing for poor reasons Fallacies must be explained, not simple identified Make up your own definitions and explanations­ don’t depend on the textbook or slides. You will be allowed  to bring your notes into the test Sometimes there may be 3 fallacies for a single premise Even when argument contains fallacies the conclusion may be true  There is no complete inventory of fallacies­ we will be covering approx. 20 ­ You should only be using the info on slides, textbooks, etc. Fallacy #1  1. Appeal to force or threat of force Instead of offering reasons this fallacy threatens to use force to get another to do something to accept an  idea (You scare someone in to making you do something)  Fallacy #2  Instead of offering reasons to support a conclusion they persuade us by manipulating our emotions and  desires  2.a Appeal to pity­ Don’t determine the defendant guilty because they have suffered enough 2.b Appeal to fear­  if you don’t find the defendant guilty, you may be his/her next victim  2.c Appeal to guilt or shame­you should make an exception or ill lose my scholarship fail out of  university 2.d appeal to flattery­ you should make an exception to my late assignment because you are such a  compassionate professor  ( Emotions aren’t always negative, can be positive)  Fallacy #3 Ad hominem 3a)Opponent is insulted or abused­ the mayor is sexiest pig so we shouldn’t listen to his plans to reorganize  city council is effective because once the arguer is made to look suspicious, ridiculous or inconsistent, they seem  untrustworthy, and by extension their argument shouldn’t be trusted  sometimes is confused with question beginning epithet 3.b) circumstantial ad Hominem Argument criticized on basis that it merely advocates the interests of the opponent ­distinct from abusive ad hominem because focus is on persons circumstances or situation, not their  personal chracteristics  Example: sure he opposes rent control, he owns two apartment buildings, dosen’t he?  3.c gult by association ­ instead of offering reasons, an opponents argument is discredited because she or he is the member of a  particular group ­ if you agree with therioes about global warming you must be a radical environmentalist 3.d opponent, or person advocating a position, is accused of acting in a manner which contradicts that position. Charge of hypocrisy­ pot calling the kettle back  3.e Poisoning the well ­ a physchological technique which aims to make it impossible for the opponent to reply or disagree ­it dispenses with objections by making anyone who object appear foolish ­or the opponent is discredited before they present their argument ­ a rebuttal seems to only strengthen the accusation Anyone who has any sense would agree that gun control is necessary  Sometimes what appears to be an ad hominem fallacy is justified For example: if someone is testifying based on his or her experience 4. Shifting the burden of proof When someone who introduces an argument, shifts the burden of proof to the critic rather supporting their  argument with reasons Example: You will have to show me why I shouldn’t believe in astrology before I will consider giving it up ­ Not a fallacy if the opponent notes that the arguer has not supplied support for the argument and  needs to ­ 5. Self evident truth The arguer presents his or her position as self­evident and not requiring defense.  Indicator phrases: “it is self evident that”  “ it is obvious to everyone”  “ no one can deny that”  “obviously” “it is common sense”  This man has lied his way out of far tougher situations than this. Obviously we shouldn’t listen to him.  6. Appeal to ignorance the listeners inability to disprove the conclusion is used as proof of the arguments correctness “ You cant prove me wrong, therefore, I must be right” or “ If you cant prove it is right then it must be  wrong”  ­Appealing to the lack of evidence There must be extraterrestrial life. No one has proven there isn’t.  *the difference is appeal to ignorance appeals to a lack of evidence, while shifting the burden of proof is  7. Loaded presupposition Also known as fallacy of many questions, fallacy of loaded questions or fallacy of complex questions An argument is made which has a controversial presupposition buried within it.  Example: the scandalous goods and services. Tax introduced by the liberals needs to be rejected if the  country is to regain its economic health. 8. Circular reasoning  Instead of presenting reasons to support the conclusion, the premises merely resasserts the conclusion  in different words  ­Arguments that beg the questions are circular arguments Example: the belief in god is universal because everyone belives in god. Miracles are impossible  because they cannot happen.    Question:  MODR LECTURE #2 10/08/2013 9a) appeal to popularity we are told to accept something as true because it is widely believed  accepted or done  MODR LECTURE #2 10/08/2013 Instead of reasons we are told to accept something as true because it is widely believed accepted or done 9b) Appeal to tradition  1. Appeal to common belief­ Mc dicks burgers are healthy because there popular 2. Appeal to common practice­ tradition and custom can be result of a history or oppression The institution of marriage is as old as human history and thus must be considered sacred. Everyone uses formal logic in teaching critical thinking so it must be the best way for students to learn  critical thinking. 9.c Appeal to group membership or patriotism( mob appeal)  uses patriotism, repetition, sarcasm, innuendo, high mindedness to exploit our emotions ­ exploits our need to beong to a group and assures us that group is right flattering the or appealing  to their prejudices  ­ The presentation is theatrical, repetition is used ­ Makes it difficult for us to disagree or express the opposite opinion ­ For if we disagree we are excluded from the group All individuals loyal to their country will agree with the security measures put in place since Sept. 11 .   I’m a working man myself, and I know how hard it is to make ends meet today. Because you are a college audience, I know I can speak to you about difficult matters seriously. MODR LECTURE #2 10/08/2013 9.d appeal to  novelty or change  somethings old fashioned so lets just toss it­ lets do something else  That’s old­fashioned and must be wrong. Thomas Aquinas’ views on marriage may have been correct for his time, but they are dated and don’t fit the  th values of the 20  century. 9.e Appeal to dislike or unusual or uncommon beliefs or habits The majority of society is disgusted by sado­masochism, therefore it must be wrong. Polygamy is rightfully disliked by most people.  9.f appeal to racial religious or social prejudice  We all know that homosexuals are….. 10. Appeals to authority  not always fallacious, can be good but their criteria have to meet ­ appeals to authority are a secondary way of getting evidence. You are being asked to e convinced  on someones word or authority Criteria for good arguments from Authority 1 The authority has to be knowledgeable, trustworthy, and free of bias and their credentials should be  stated. MODR LECTURE #2 10/08/2013 The knowledge of the authority is current 3. Those credentials should be relevant to the argument 4. Authority shouldn’t be biased or stand to gain from their argument  Claim should be one with wide agreement among experts  If you like people, be sure you brush with Colgate.  Walt Frazier wouldn’t think of brushing
More Less

Related notes for HUMA 1160

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit