Textbook Notes (368,125)
Canada (161,663)
POLI 243 (70)
Chapter

Understanding international trade policies.docx - Odell

4 Pages
297 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 243
Professor
Mark Brawley
Semester
Fall

Description
Understanding international trade policies ­ Odell • Why do governments act as they do in matters of international trade? four  different perspectives: they emphasize market conditions, leaders’ values and  beliefs, national political institutions and global­political economic structures.  Market Perspective: market conditions shape trade politics and policies.   EX: in the US free trade is best for the country, but not for as some weak national  industries. Thus they organize politically to press for protection, and the government  protects their products. →  the ones affected (household consumers) usually do not  express their interests politically.  • Politics is a process of exchange among individuals who behave according to  their short run personal interests: a protectionist market makes sense because  rent seeking industries trade their votes and campaign contributions to politicians.  • When markets shift, so the distribution of political pressures: thus the  government policies shift as well.  • The concept of endogenous policy generates the following paradox: in a  highly competitive political system, the equilibrium policies are not under control  of the policymakers →  in the case of protectionism, trade restriction balance the  power of narrow interests (lobbies), against the power of broad interests (voters).  • This theory is very useful, yet can be misleading if analyzed alone: it is one  thing to focus on economic markets, and another one is to assume that politics  itself is a market, and that government is nothing else than an auctioneer  responding to society. Most of these works abstract form international relations  altogether →  when reading studies from a market perspective, we forget about  power imbalances, trade wars, cartel arrangements, international organizations  and liberalizing negotiations that have defined commercial history. → These  omissions are accepted, however, because they make a tradeoff between  parsimony and accuracy.  Industrial Market Conditions:  • National markets change over time through structural shifts in factor  endowments:  In the US, labor benefits disproportionately from protection; as  labor’s share in production declines, its relative political influence also declines,  as so should the fortune of the political party tied to it →  thus protection also  declines. • When times are good, factors tend to stay out of politics: yet, when the factors  economic fortunes goes down, it transfers its economic activity into lobbying and  political activity.   • Over time and across industries policy preferences are expected to vary with  the industry or firm’s position in the economy:  o With rising import penetration and declining returns on capital, wages and  employment rates, industries are expected to favor increasing protection  for themselves.  o The greater the industry’s dependence on exports and foreign investments,  the more it should resist demands for protectionism and favor import  liberalization.  • Government seen as an intermediary: responding to voters and groups  attempting to maximize short run direct self­interests.  • Contradictions about the assumption that the key divide lies between L and  K:  o Classes do not often behave as units in trade politics.  o Republican administrations sometimes favored more protectionism than  Democrats’.  Interdependence and Anti Protection pressures: • This theory postulates on industry’s political demands, and not policy itself as the  dependent variable.  • Increasing interdependence over the decades increases the likelihood that firms in  the same industry will diverge in the degree of their international orientation,  dividing more sectors politically when they confront an import challenge.   • Firms least dependent of exports and multinational operations tend to respond to  import competition by calling for protection.  • Firms more internationalized tend to prefer free trade, despite the import  penetration at home.  • EX: the demand for protection was more muted in the 70’s (more economic  interdependence) than it was in the 20’s (less economic interdependence).  Macro market Conditions:  • It is the country’s relative economic position which counts for trade balance:  this logic links changes in the macroeconomy to changes in exchange rates and  trades flows →  which affect output and employment aggregates at home → which  lead
More Less

Related notes for POLI 243

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit