Textbook Notes (358,894)
Canada (155,912)
POLI 244 (68)
Chapter

U.S. Strategy in a Unipolar World by William Wohlforth NOTE..
U.S. Strategy in a Unipolar World by William Wohlforth NOTES.txt

3 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

School
McGill University
Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 244
Professor
Fernando Nunez- Mietz
Semester
Fall

Description
U.S. Strategy in a Unipolar World by William Wohlforth NOTES  Outline:  One of the defining characteristics of the international order since WW2 has been the dominant position of  the United States, which wields a power that is without historic precedent. Yet the rapid pace of change and  growing complexity of the world over the last few decades has undercut US influenceits ability to bring  about the outcomes it seeks. In other words, the life of a superpower isnt what it used to be, and because  so many different actors and factors hold sway in the contemporary world, there is no going back.  Hence the United States should not assume it can resume a command role simply by reversing recent  policies, if indeed it ever had such a degree of control. The United States may be able to boost its influence,  but it wont be a simple matter. The US remains a potential source of key global public goods, but the  superpower must provide goods that the rest of the world wants and needs, and it will have to reach new  understandings with the others about roles and responsibilities.  Brief:  A Contemporary critique of 'US Stratgey in a Unipolar world', perspectives on Wohlforth (and Stephen G  Brooks):  Unipolarity is one of the hotter IR theory topics, and it's virtually impossible to discuss the subject without  reference to William C. Wohlforth essay 'U.S. Strategy in a Unipolar World', it provokes the reader to rethink  his or her views, and engages seriously with realism, liberalism, and constructivism.  Their argument, in a nutshell, is that from the above schools have underrated the United States' ability to  transcend structural constraints: realists overrate the impact of the balance of power; liberals overrate the  impact of economic interdependence and international institutions, and constructivists overrate legitimacy  constraints on the United States.  Stephen G Brook sums up Wolforth's argument brilliantly:  ...provides the necessary analysis for concluding that the United States does, in fact, have an opportunity to  revise the system ­­ and, moreover, that this opportunity will long endure...  Because their theories ignore or  misunderstand the implications of the unipolar distribution of power, scholars have generally  underestimated the U.S. potential to remake the post­1991 international system. More realistic theories with  a clear­eyed appraisal of the workings of a unipolar system would lead them to see the systemic constraints  they believe stand in the way of such a policy for what they are: artifacts of the scholarship of previous eras.  Now that's an argument!  The topic of unipolarity has spawned two main debates: The first over how long unipolarity is likely to  endure, and the second over whether unipolarity is peaceful. But to my mind, there is a third interesting  question worth examining ­­ the same one Gen. David Petraeus asked journalist Rick Atkinson on his way  into Iraq: "Tell me how this ends?"  For many scholars, this is a moot question: Unipolarity is already ending. But even for those who think the  end is further down the road, imperial overstretch ­­ taking on a range of commitments beyond our means ­­  is one way America might fall from being in a league of its own to being just first among equals.  In a recent Foreign Affairs article, both Brooks and Wohlforth waved off dangers such as the long­term  fiscal imbalances in the United States by observing that these problems "can be fixed." Similarly, in a  roundtable review o
More Less

Related notes for POLI 244

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit