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Chapter 3

BPK 143 Chapter Notes - Chapter 3: Triceps Brachii Muscle, Strength Training, Bench Press


Department
Biomedical Physio & Kines
Course Code
BPK 143
Professor
Tony Leyland
Chapter
3

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Chapter 3 : Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Basic Resistance Training
Link : http://www.sfu.ca/~leyland/Kin143%20Files/Musculoskeletal%20Anatomy.pdf
Bone List
1. Skull
2. Mandible
3. Hyoid Bone
4. Cervical Vertebra
5. Clavicle
6. Sternum
7. Costal Cartilage
8. Ribs
9. Scapula (Shoulder Blades)
10. Humerus
11. Radius
12. Ulna
13. Carpal Bones
14. Metacarpal Bones
15. Phalanges of Fingers
16. Thoracic Vertebra
17. Lumbar Vertebra
18. Sacrum
19. Os Coxa
20. Femur
21. Patella (Knee Caps)
22. Tibia
23. Fibula
24. Tarsal Bones
25. Metatarsal Bones
26. Phalanges of toes
- There are five regions to the spine (Cervical, Thoracic, Lumbar, Sacrum and Coccyx)
- The skeleton is the point of attachment for our muscles. It provides a rigid series of
levers on which the muscles can pull.

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Anatomical Terms
- Terms in bold are common terms. Terms in Italics are less commonly used and know the
definitions is less important.
- These are terms used to describe the positions of the structures relative to other
structures in the body
Terms Definition
Anterior Front side of the body, also known as ventral
(ex. The kneecap is located on the anterior
side of the leg)
Cranial Above or near the head, also known as
Superior
(ex. The hand is a part of the superior
extremity)
Distal Farthest end from the trunk or point of origin
of a part
(ex. the hand is located at the distal end of
the forearm)
Inferior Towards the feet, lower.
(ex. the foot is part of the inferior extremity)
Lateral Away from the midline of the body.
(ex. the little toe is located at the lateral side
of the foot)
Medial Towards the midline of the body.
(ex. the middle toe is located at the medial
side of the foot
Posterior Back side of the body, also known as dorsal
(ex. the shoulder blades are located on the
posterior side of the body)
Superior Above or Near the head, also known as
cranial
(ex. The hand is a part of the superior
extremity)
Caudal In Quadrupeds (animals with 4 feet),
pertaining to the tail end or the hind part
Dorsal Back side of the body. Also known as
Posterior
Infra Prefix meaning below or under
Supra Prefix meaning above or over
Ventral Front side of the body. Also known as anterior
Muscle Anatomy and Function

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- This image shows the structure of the human muscle
- Muscles produce force (muscle contractions)through the attachment of proteins (myosin
+ actin) and them overlapping one another
- This is called the “Sliding Filament Theory “
- Essentially The sliding filament theory is the explanation for how muscles contract to
produce force
- Myoin + Actin attachment and overlapping creates Muscle Contractions and thus
produces foruce
Movement Terminology
- These are the movement terms used when discussing human movements
- They’re used to describe how the parts of the body moves
Shoulder (Glenohumeral)
Flexion: Bending the joint, resulting in a decrease of angle. Moving the upper arm upwards to the
front
(Shoulder Flexion is when the arms move straight forward and up )
Extension/Hyperextension : Straightening the joint result in an increase of angle; moving the upper
arm down to the rear
Adduction : Medial movement towards the midline of the body. Bringing the shoulder blade towards
the midline of the body.
Abduction : Lateral movement away from the midline of the body. Moving the upper arm up to the
side and away from the body. As the name suggest “Abduct” meaning carrying away)
Transverse Adduction / Transverse Flexion :
Medial movement towards the midline of the body in a horizontal plane. Moving the upper arm
towards and across the chest.
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