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Chapter 24

PSYB45H3 Chapter 24: Chapter 24
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7 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB45H3
Professor
Jessica Dere

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Description
Chapter 24: Planning, Applying, and Evaluating a Behavioral Program Deciding Whether to Design a Program Following a Referral 1. Was the Problem Referred Primarily for the Benefit of the Client? o you must determine whether the accomplishment of the goal will be for the benefit of the client o If its accomplishment is for the benefit of others, it should be at least neutral for the client o Ethical considerations may require that some referrals simply stop here 2. Is the Problem Important to the Client or to Others? o Will solving the problem lead to less aversiveness or more positive reinforcement for the client or others? o Will solving the problem be likely to give rise directly or indirectly to other desirable behaviors? o If the answer to either of these questions is no, you should reconsider your involvement with the problem 3. Can the Problem and the Goal Be Specified So That You Are Dealing with a Specific Behavior or Set of Behaviors That Can Be Measured in Some Way? o Many referrals are vague, subjective, and general, such as, Chris is a poor student, My child is driving me up a wall, Im really an unorganized person. o If the problem is initially vague you must specify a component behavior or behaviors that: define the problem can be measured or assessed objectively o it is important to ask whether dealing with the defined component behavior(s) will solve the general problem in the eyes of the referring agent or agencies o If it is impossible to agree with the agent on the component behaviors that define the problem, then you should probably stop there o If you do achieve agreement, it should be specified in writing 4. Have You Eliminated the Possibility That the Problem Involves Complications That Would Necessitate Referring It to Another Specialist? o are you the appropriate person to deal with this problem? o If there is any chance that the problem has medical complications, serious psychological ramifications such as the danger of suicide, or a DSM5 diagnosis that you are not qualified to treat, the appropriate specialist should be consulted o You should then treat the problem only in a manner that the specialist recommends 5. Is the Problem One That Would Appear to Be Easily Manageable? o If the problem is to decrease an undesirable behavior, has the behavior been occurring for a short time, under narrow stimulus control, and with no intermittent reinforcement? A problem with these characteristics is likely to be easier to solve than an undesirable behavior that has been occurring for a long time, under the control of many situations, and with a history of intermittent reinforcement
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