Textbook Notes (368,214)
Canada (161,710)
Psychology (9,695)
PSYA02H3 (961)
Chapter 13

Chapter 13 – Psychological Disorders
Premium

7 Pages
114 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYA02H3
Professor
Steve Joordens
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 13 – Psychological Disorders Medical Model – Uses understanding of medical conditions to think about psychological  conditions. ­ Varies by culture, someone in North America might be diagnosed with schizophrenia if they saw  hallucinations, but somewhere else might be thought to be possessed by evil spirits. ▯ Defining Abnormal Psychology Abnormal Psychology – The psychological study of mental illness. Maladaptive Behaviours ­ A behaviour that hinders a persons ability to function (at work,  school, relationships etc.) Criteria for maladaptive behaviours: 1) Behaviour must distress ones self or others 2) Impairs ability to function 3) Increases risk of injury, death, or legal problems ▯ Diagnosing Psychological Disorders ­ Psychologists and psychiatrists rely on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for  Mental Illness (DSM­IV) – Manual that establishes criteria for the diagnosis of mental  disorders. ­ More than 350 disorders are identified in the DSM­IV ­ Identify a likely cause, the psychological experience that follows, and the time course for  symptoms. ­ Does have limitations – treats most symptoms in an either/or fashion, either you have the  symptom or you don’t. Etiology ­ The origins or causes of symptoms and the prognosis, how the symptoms with persist  or change over time. ▯ Categorical Vs. Dimensional Views of Disorders Dimensional View – Consist of typical thoughts and behaviours except they are more severe  and longer lasting than usual. ­ May occur in inappropriate contexts Ex. Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Categorical View ­ Regards different mental conditions as separate types. ­ Not just extreme versions of normal thoughts, something all together different. ­ Can’t have “partial” form of disorder (ex. Down syndrome) ▯ The Insanity Defense ­ Insanity is a legal concept and it not directly related to psychological diagnosis and treatment. Insanity Defense ­ The legal strategy of claiming that a defendant was unable to differentiate  between right and wrong what the criminal act was committed. ­ Is a rare occurrence, used in less than 1% of federal cases. ­ “Not guilty by reason of insanity”, known as the M’Naghten rule. Stigma – Include negative stereotypes about what it means to have a psychological disorder. ­ May lead to discrimination, and alienation. ­ Learning about ones own diagnosis might increase positive emotions during treatment. ▯ Defining and Classifying Personality Disorders Personality Disorders ­ Unusual patterns of behaviour for ones culture that are maladaptive,  distressing to oneself and or others, and resistant to change. ­ Some people feel no empathy towards others. ­ Become rapidly attached to someone only to reject him or her. ­  May apply to   anyone   at some point.  Actual disorders are extreme and persistent cases. ▯ Borderline Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) ­ Characterized by intense extremes between  positive and negative emotions. ­ Tendency to think in all­or­none terms. ­ No matter the type of relationship they have there will always be periods of conflict. ­ Fear of abandonment ­ Self­ injury ▯ Narcissistic Personality Disorder Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) – Characterized by an inflated sense of self,  an intense need for attention, as well as intense self­doubt and fear of abandonment. ­ Likely to engage in academic dishonesty, feeling of entitlement makes them feel no remorse  about it. ▯ Histrionic Personality Disorder  Histrionic Personality Disorder – Characterized by excessive attention seeking and  dramatic behaviour. ­ Drawing people in with flirtatious, provocative behaviour. ▯ Antisocial Personality Disorder Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) – Habitual pattern of willingly violating others  personal rights with very little sign of empathy or remorse. ­ Physically and verbally abusive ­ Also known as “psychopath” ­ Men are more likely to be diagnosed ­ Under reactive to stress Conduct Disorders – Often precursors to psychopathy ­ Adults and children with psychopathy or conduct disorders have difficulty learning tasks that  require decision making. ▯ Biological Factors to Personality Disorders ­ A number of specific genes seem to contribute to emotional instability through serotonin systems  in the brain. ­ Unique activity in the limbic system and frontal lobes – regions that are associated with emotional  responses and impulse control. ▯ Comorbidity and Personality Disorders Comorbidity ­ The presence of two disorders simultaneously, or the presence of a second  disorder that affects the one being treated. ­ Substance abuse is often comorbid with personality disorders ­ Intertwining presents a challenge for treatment. ▯ Dissociative Identity Disorder ­ Unaware of what’s going on around you. ­ Difficulty determining whether an event really happened. Dissociative Disorder – Characterized by a split between conscious awareness from feeling,  memory, and identity. 1)  Dissociative Fugue –  A period of autobiographical memory loss (forget past memories of life). ­ May develop new identity in new location with no recollection of the past. 2) Depersonalized Disorder – Belief that one has changed in a way that no longer makes them  “real”. 3) Dissociative Amnesia – Severe loss of memory, usually from a specific stressful event, when no  biological cause for amnesia is prese
More Less

Related notes for PSYA02H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit