Textbook Notes (367,933)
United States (205,912)
Boston College (1,174)
OPER 1021 (12)
All (1)
Chapter 7

Operations Management Chapter 7, 9 and 10 Notes!

5 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Operations Management
Course
OPER 1021
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 7: Managing Flow Variability What are the key drivers of inventory when customer demands are unpredictable? Should  they invest in a better forecasting system? What should be the right inventory level?  What service level is appropriate to offer? Should they continue to serve their customers  using a decentralized network or build a central distribution facility to serve all  customers? Matching inflows (supply) and outflows (demands) is a critical aspect of any business  process.  7.1 Demand Forecasts and Forecast Errors Demand varies over time.  Forecasting: a process of predicting future demand Forecasting Methods: can be subjective or objective • Subjective­ based on judgment and experience and include customer surveys and  expert judgements • Objective: based on data analysis Intuitively, we know that aggregation reduces variability, or reduces the amount of  variability relative to aggregate mean demand.  Less safety inventory is needed in the aggregate.  *Reducing variability and safety inventory by pooling and centralizing stock. Stockouts occur whenever demand exceeds supply. Ex. Order lamps at a 20,000 ROP. Demand is 2,000 per day. If demand is equally likely  to be above or below 20,000, then there is a 50% probability that keeping an inventory of  20,000 units will result in a stockout.  Stockouts imply that customer demands will go unsatisfied. This can lead to lost  customers and lost revenue and loss of customer goodwill, which may lead to future loss  of sales.  To avoid stockouts, just in case actual demand exceeds the forecast, customers keep a  safety inventory, inventory in excess of the average or in excess of forecast demand, or  safety stock.  7.2.1 Service level measures Consider economic trade­offs between the cost of stockouts and the cost of carrying  excess inventory. Some are intangible, so you look at customer service and quality. The process manager often decides to provide a certain level of customer service and then  determines the amount of safety inventory needed to meet that objective. ­ cycle service level: the probability that there will be no stockout within a time  interval ­ fill rate: the fraction of total demand satisfied from inventory on hand Fill rate= 1­ Expected Stockout/ Expected Demand * not commonly used Effective inventory policies can be devised to achieve a desired level of either measure of  customer service.  7.2.2 Continuous Review, Reorder Point System Review inventory either continuously (real time) or periodically (weekly/monthly) How much should I order? ­ depends on the trade­off between fixed cost of placing orders and the variable  holding cost of carrying the inventory that results from larger order quantities.  Reorder point policy: Having initially ordered a fixed quantity, the process manager  monitors inventory level continuously and then reorders (a quantity perhaps equal to  EOQ) once available inventory position falls to a prespecified reorder point.  Leadtime Demand (LTD): total flow­unit requirement during replenishment time The reorder point inventory is used to meet flow­unit requirements until the new order is  received L periods later.  The risk of stockout occurs during this period of replenishment lead time.  Uncertainty in leadtime may be due to a supplier’s unreliability in delivering on­time  orders.  When the leadtime demand exceeds the reorder point, a stockout occurs.  ROP=LTD, reorder point is set at the average leadtime demand If we carry just enough inventory to satisfy forecast demand during leadtime (with a  mean LTD), then actual leadtime demand is symmetric around its mean. This means that  if we carry just enough inventory to satisfy forecast demand during leadtime, then actual  leadtime demand will exceed forecast demand in 50% of our order cycles. We will suffer  stockouts and service level will be 50% Safety Inventory= ROP­ LTD ROP= Avg. LTD + Safety stock        = LTD + Safety Inventory If the actual leadtime demand is larger than its average value of LTD, th
More Less

Related notes for OPER 1021

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit