Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
Commerce (1,696)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2 - Communication

4 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMMERCE 3S03
Professor
Carolyn Capretta
Semester
Winter

Description
rd Management Skills 3S03 March 3 , 2014 Chapter 2: Communication Creating Persuasive Messages The first rule of effective communication is to analyze your audience.  People are convinced to align their attitudes and behaviours with those of someone else for three  main reasons. Aristotle first articulated these 3 elements of persuasion.  1. Ethos – we are persuaded by the personal credibility of a speaker 2. Pathos – we respond to emotional appeals in a message 3. Logos – we are moved by the logical arguments supporting a position Ethos: Personal Credibility It is important to gain and maintain a trustworthy reputation. Research indicates that as the  requests you make require others to do more and more, your personal credibility becomes more  and more important. People find your message most appealing when it is clear that you truly understand them. I.e.  emphasize ways you are similar to your audience. Remind people that some of your credibility  comes from being similar to them.  Establish your authority over expertise.  Ethos boils down to expertise and relationships. Make sure the quality of your presentation  reflects your expertise. Pathos: Arousing Others’ Emotions Persuasive appeals that tug at your heartstrings, make you laugh, or even scare you are using  pathos to arouse your emotions. Most effective when stories and examples that are highly  relevant to their listeners are used; or when listeners’ emotions are aroused in a way that prompts  their compliance with the message. Robert Cialdini: fairness and storytelling. People will treat you as you treated them. Logos: Using Evidence These facts, figures, and other forms of persuasion help listeners believe they are making an  informed, rational choice. Two kinds of arguments: 1. Deductive: moves from the general to the specific We make an assertion, then provide evidence in support of that assertion. 2. Inductive: moves from talking about specific things to generalizing We present the evidence and then draw conclusions from it 2 types of evidence available: 1. Statistics 2. Appeal to authority What an audience is looking for in a speaker is prudence, the practical wisdom to make the right  choice at the right time.  Delivering Powerful Messages The five S’s are a 5 step process that can guide you when preparing any persuasive presentation.  The S’s are sequential; the first 3 steps involve preparation, while the fourth and fifth focus on  the actual presentation. [Type text] [Type text] [Type text] The 5 S’s Strategy Different approaches for different people. Good strategizing for a presentation would include  asking: • Who is my audience? • What is my goal? • Ethos, pathos, logos Structure You now know the arguments most persuasive to your audience, so order them.  Support Some of the most common types of support materials are: examples, statistics, testimony, stories Style There are 3 noteworthy differences between giving speeches and holding conversations. Public  speaking is more structured. Public speaking is more formal. Public speaking requires a different  kind of talking.  Supplement Prepare for Q&A. Key points to remember when designing visual aids: 1. Colour – use it.  2. Consistency 3. Simplicity 4. Balance 5. Visibility 6. Evaluation Special communication Skills and Contexts Choosing Your Communication Medium When deciding, consider two important variables: the information richness of the available  communication channels and the topic’s complexity. Information richness is the potential information­carrying capa
More Less

Related notes for COMMERCE 3S03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit