Textbook Notes (381,222)
CA (168,408)
UTSC (19,325)
Geography (159)
GGRA03H3 (34)
Charles H (3)
Chapter 4

Chapter 4 Notes

4 Pages
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Department
Geography
Course Code
GGRA03H3
Professor
Charles H

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Chapter 4: Contemporary Urbanization & Environmental Dynamics
-the first urban revolution began over 6,000 years ago with the first cities in Mesopotamia
-these new cities were reflections of concentrated social power
-the first urban revolution, independently experienced in Africa, Asia, and the Americas, was a
new way of living in the world
-the second urban revolution began in the 18th century with the linkage between urbanization and
industrialization
-we are now in the third urban revolution which began in the mid 20th century
-the third urban revolution has increased urban populations, development of megacities and the
growth of giant metropolitan regions
-services have become the cutting-edge of rapid urban economic development
-urban landscapes are revalorized and devalorized at an often bewildering pace
-there were major environmental resonances of this dramatic shift
Urban Dynamics
-the first trend is that the world have become increasingly urban
-there has been a major demographic and social shift with important consequences for
environmental quality
-currently ¾ s of global population growth occurs in the urban areas of developing countries
-significant amounts of development loans and funds ending up concentrated in urban areas
-development projects that were focused in cities included water and sanitation systems,
electrical systems, and the buildings of roads
-the net result was the encouragement of massive rural to urban migration
-in many developing cities, the population growth often exceeded the formalcoping capacity of
the city
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Description
Chapter 4: Contemporary Urbanization & Environmental Dynamics -the first urban revolution began over 6,000 years ago with the first cities in Mesopotamia -these new cities were reflections of concentrated social power -the first urban revolution, independently experienced in Africa, Asia, and the Americas, was a new way of living in the world -the second urban revolution began in the 18 century with the linkage between urbanization and industrialization th -we are now in the third urban revolution which began in the mid 20 century -the third urban revolution has increased urban populations, development of megacities and the growth of giant metropolitan regions -services have become the cutting-edge of rapid urban economic development -urban landscapes are revalorized and devalorized at an often bewildering pace -there were major environmental resonances of this dramatic shift Urban Dynamics -the first trend is that the world have become increasingly urban -there has been a major demographic and social shift with important consequences for environmental quality -currently s of global population growth occurs in the urban areas of developing countries -significant amounts of development loans and funds ending up concentrated in urban areas -development projects that were focused in cities included water and sanitation systems, electrical systems, and the buildings of roads -the net result was the encouragement of massive rural to urban migration -in many developing cities, the population growth often exceeded the formal coping capacity of the city www.notesolution.com
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