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Lecture 4

Lecture 4 Socio – Economic Rights Key concepts: substantive equality remedying group/categorical/individual inequality Preface: competing world views about socio-economic rights 1) International protection covenant on economical social & political righ

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Department
Social Science
Course
SOSC 1910
Professor
Dorathy Moore
Semester
Fall

Description
AP SOSC 1210 (lecture) Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Socio – Economic Rights Key concepts: substantive equality remedying group/categorical/individual inequality Preface: competing world views about socio-economic rights 1) International protection  covenant on economical social & political rights, Limburg principles & Maastricht guidelines 2) Canadian situation a) evidence of poverty in Canada b) invalidating myths c) forms of discrimination i) omission – law = neglect ii) discrimination of silence iii) commission differential rights = diminution 3) systemic discrimination – policy decisions  View: socio-economic rights not right at all  Interfere with free market operation – capitalism  Keep gov’t away, don’t regulate, market provide all want & needs  Eg. US healthcare o State funded vs. insurance funded o Don’t take into account can’t afford for private healthcare  Argue: market mechanism are inherently unfair, unequal relations  Will create huge debts in incomes  At international level there is huge gap, rich vs. poor o Top 20% rich received 25% of global income o Bottom 20% poor received 1.4% of global income  Produce high level economic inequality  High unemployment, can’t find jobs to sustain self  Structural inadequacy o State must have meaningful safety net o State must have ability to sustain powers o Or else huge disparity (eg. France prior revolution)  Gov’t need protect citizens, have to enact laws to ensure protection exist  After 1986, Limburg principles  Maastricht guidelines placed to make bearable but to fullest extent with states economic need o Healthcare o Education o Food o shelter  homeless & food banks = human right violation  unsafe working environment, failure to support wage bargaining  minimum wage that can’t begin to sustain life = human right violation  states make sure rights protected  try to make progress to greater equality or social conditions  so all experience full citizenship = democracy goal  human dignity  economic rights at base of rights, interrelated with political rights  freedom means nothing with no economic right  human rights need to be met Violations of Economic-Social Rights  constitute neglect occur from omission  gov’t policies  discriminate by omission, targeting population, only applicable to some  fail to obligation  eg. Taking tax of poor to pay tax for rich, tax cut?  When gov’t pass laws to limit poor  discrimination by diminution  States unwillingness to meet needs & inability to provide Canadian Situation  Global economy has its risks  Argue: last 20 years, reduction of gov’t in favor of free market  To attract multinational business, need to be business friendly  need advantage in tax  Gov’t tax base eroded  Ironic  in meltdown, seen gov’t tendency to jump in & bail business out, give $$$ out  Gov’t do all to maintain jobs & cut spending/activity in social programs  Social programs left to be funded privately but not happening  Both federal/provincial gov’t claim not accountable  Inequality not attributable to economic sector  1998, Canada, 10 out of 17 on index  More wealth in fewer hands  OECD o ORGANIZATION OF Co-Operation & Development o Report analyzed 20 years of income data o Canada
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