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Study Guide

[EAST 213] - Final Exam Guide - Everything you need to know! (230 pages long)


Department
Asian Language & Literature
Course Code
EAST 213
Professor
Michelle Cho
Study Guide
Final

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McGill
EAST 213
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Culture: exists but isn’t fixed
Looked at tourism videos:
Video #1: Directed towards Westerners (English, clothes, celebrity....)
Video #2 (Korea Tourism Organization 2015) : Started with traditional Korean
elements,
Common theme: Korean culture is on offer to the world to enjoy, it is
dynamic/peaceful and contemporary cosmopolitan and the beautiful,
traditional past
Juxtaposition of history modern is important in Korea with regards to
tourism and 20th century development
Lecture #1:
History = A Narrative
Narratives determine how historical change is understood and interpreted
History is a story, not just cold hard facts
Who is telling the story, to who, and for what purpose
Look at the situation in which the story is being told
Historiography = the study of how history has been written (which stories have
been told and why)
This class will go between history as a narrative and historiography
Dilemmas of Modern Korean historiography
Who controls the narrative? For what ends?
Ideologically fraught - being able to tell the story of Korea as a nation/culture
has been fought over a lot
Is a “neutral” story possible?
We will try by looking at different accounts/sides
Why is this meta-view important?
History is not benign - it has real effects
The dominant story that is circulated can affect politics/society
Ex. News story - Korean history was fought over because the government
wanted to designate which history books can be taught - people were
concerned from which angle from which stories are told, how this would
affect the stories
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find more resources at oneclass.com
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Ex. Dates/chronological timelines seem neutral but they organize information
and present it in a certain way
Question: How was Korea able to maintain a distinct culture and political
organization, despite a long history of invasion and subordination to larger, more
powerful neighbour?
Between China and Japan (a shrimp between 2 whales)
Bigger, more influential neighbours - how did they remain a separate entity?
Do NOT ask - what is the special essence of Korea that has maintained it?
Answer (that some historians give - be critical): For key scholars of pre-
modern Korea, the key to establishing and maintaining a distinct Korean
culture and social organization lies in the transition from Koryo to Choson -
the Confucianization of Korea
Choson - dynastic rule of ~500 years (long time for such a stable
reign)
How Pre-Modern Korean History is Told:
Focuses on Confucianism, an elite-scholarly enterprise
Leaves out most of the population
Examines the hegemonic group to look for the main factors (ideology and
social structure) that shaped institutions of power and influence
Can be leaving out another story
This is the culture that you see in tourist ads (ex. How eats palace foods anymore?)
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
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