Study Guides (248,518)
Canada (121,606)
Midterm

LINGUIST 2S03 Midterm: LING2S03 - TEST REVIEW #2
Premium

19 Pages
36 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Linguistics
Course
LINGUIST 2S03
Professor
Nikolai Penner
Semester
Winter

Description
  SOCIOLINGUISTICS - LING2S03  WINTER SEMESTER 2017  INSTRUCTOR: DR. NIKOLAI PENNER    LANGUAGE CHANGE - CHAPTER #4  DEFINITIONS  INTERNAL CHANGE  EXTERNAL CHANGE  - Language change motivated by  - Language change motivated by  processes relying on the  contact with other languages  structures within a language      - Borrowing words (influence of other  1. Phonological - lenition  languages)  2. Morphological - reanalysis  - Phonological borrowing  3. Syntax - grammaticalization  - Lexical  4. Semantic - semantic change   - Calques  - Positive + desirable  - Critical + puristic = negative  DIFFUSION MODEL  ● Spread of linguistic feature through a language, region, time  ● Change diffusing through space  GRAVITY MODEL  - Large cities > small cities > rural areas  - Spatial barriers may prevent diffusions; mountains, rivers, national boundaries  LINGUISTIC CHANGE & AGE  ● Linguistic variation = linguistic change       1        AGE-GRADING  ● Using speech appropriate to the speaker’s age group  1. Panel study = same participants + different points in time  2. Trend study = same community + different points in time  STUDY - MILTON KEYNES  SOUTH EAST ENGLAND  ● Weak social networks = they don’t associate with the locals  ● No strong close connections; no extended families  ● Socially fluid populations  ● Youths = distinctive local forms  GENDER  WOMEN  MEN  - Tend to ​hypercorrect more  - Non-standard​ linguistics  (‘correct’ form, but not used in the  - Solidarity​ within a group  standard language) b/c rights were  - Masculinity  denied  - Cohert  - Over report their usage of  - Valued more  standard forms; prestige  - Uses the ​highly status form  - Formal style  - Chooses ​standard variant; initiate  linguistic change  - Passing on language to children →  roles of nurturing           2        HOW DO CHANGES SPREAD?  GROUP TO GROUP  STYLE TO STYLE  - Changes spread simultaneously in  - More formal → less formal  different directions  1. Within an individual from one style  - Different rates  to another  - Social factors affect different  2. From one individual to another  rates + directions of change  within a social group  - Waves intersect  3. From one social group to another  - Social group = social class    CHANGE: ORIGINS & CAUSES (3)  SOCIAL CLASS & CONTACT  SOCIAL NETWORK  LIFESTYLE  TYPE  THE MILROYS  ECKERT, DETROIT  - Most sound change  - Strong ties =  - More is required  → highest social  change is slow  from girls  class​, largest # of  - Weak ties = rapid   - Burnouts → active  social contacts;  in NCCS  outside the  - Jocks →  community →  linguistically  strong ties with  conservative   other groups      3        LEXICAL DIFFUSION  ● How sound change spreads through words in a language  ● Explains how a specific change spreads  ● Diffusion over lexical change  - Diffusion does NOT equal transmission  - Transmission: change was transmitted to the children  ● Change does not…  1. Affect words simultaneously  2. Does not proceed at a uniform speed  3. S-curve effect          4        S-CURVE   DEVITT, 1989  HUDSON, 1996  - Diffusion of SE features in  - Conservative vs. Progressive  Scottish Eng  - Conservative speakers = did not  - 15-90% increase  undergo lang/ling change  - Some features spread faster than  - Assimilation → if assimilates a  others  vowel ‘tell’ → will assimilate in all  the other words  - Changes take a long time  WAVE THEORY  ● Study of language which uses waves to describe how changes flow + overlap   - Explains how people are affected  INDIVIDUAL CHANGE  - Change = progressively  - Can’t be reserved  - Same order of progression  CONCLUSION  1. Social position of the speakers  2. Strength of network  3. Lifestyle  ● Social factors; intersect = complex of language in a real life society              5        PIDGINS & CREOLE - CHAPTER #5  DEFINITIONS  PIDGIN  CREOLE  - No native speakers  - Pidgin became L1 of a new  - Contact language  generation  - Simplification of grammar + vocab  - Expanded vocab + grammar  - Lexical borrowings from local  - Wider range of functions  languages  - Extended pidgins   - 2 or 3 languages involved   - Perceived inferiority   - Reduction in morphology + syntax +  - Expansion in morphology + syntax +  numbers of functions  number of functions  - Uncommon in anterior of continents  - Regulation of phonology  - Located with direct reach of ocean  - Formed in 2 generations    - Results of Standard Language  1. Caribbean  2. West African Coast  3. Indian Ocean  4. Pacific Ocean  HISTORICAL ORIGINS  FACTORS  1. Slavery (Europeans transporting/exporting African origins)  2. Trade  3. European settlement  4. War (military personnels within countries with different languages)  5. Labour migration  FACTOR 1: SLAVERY  - Triangular system of importation; African West Coasts  - Exchange goods for slaves  - Slave factories  - If slaves spoke the same language = would plot something  - Creoles = ford vs. plantation    6        - Ford = African West Coast  - Plantation = colonies  DEFINITIONS  HORIZONTAL COMMUNICATION  VERTICAL COMMUNICATION  - Communication between slaves +  - Communication between slaves +  slaves  their master  FACTOR 2: TRADE   ● Pidgins = develop in certain types of trading activities  - Several linguistic groups are involved  - Interpreters are unavailable  ex) Naga Pidgin, India  FACTOR 3: EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT   ● PNG, China, India, East Africa  ● Fanakalo, South Africa = spoken in certain parts of the South  ● Originated from contacts between English-speakers & Zulus  ● No sign of creolization  FACTORS 4: WARS  ● American wars in Asia; Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Japan   ● Taken from local communities; similar to English, but would have words from  local language  FACTOR 5: LABOUR MIGRATION  ● Accelerated contact through employment  ● Need for quick communication   - If someone speaks broken English; is it a pidgin or a 2nd language acquisition? →  can’t tell      7        ENGLISH-BASED PIDGINS & CREOLES  ● Distribution by superstrata  - Not easily grouped b/c of complexity  - Group them by dominant language  COUNTRIES  ENGLISH  FRENCH  PORTUGUESE  OTHER CREOLES  - 35  - Louisiana  - Aruba  - 7 = Spanish  - Hawaii   - Haitian    - 5 = Dutch  - C-Island  - Seychelles  - 3 = Italian  Creole  - Mauritania  - 6 = German  - Jamaica    - Carribbean =  - Guyana  different  - Kreole  varieties  - Cameroon  - Cuba +  - Chinese  Dominican  Republic =  Spanish, but  no C+P  - Virgin Islands  =  Dutch-based  (almost  extinct)  - Spoken  English  (official  language) =  but French  Creole?  LINGUISTIC CHARACTERISTICS  ● Pidgins + creoles = well-organized structured linguistic systems  ● Pidgins = simpler structure, faster to learn, but have rules + specific structure        8        CHARACTERISTICS  THE SOUND SYSTEM  MORPHOLOGY  SYNTAX  - Fewer + less  - Lack of inflectional  - Uncomplicated  complicated sounds  nouns  causal structure  - Lack of some  - No case marking   - No relative clas=use  contrast  - Some suffixes  - Simple negative  - Fewer sounds =  particles  more variation  - Pre-verbal particles  - No  morphophonemic  variation   PIDGIN VOCABULARY I   ● Similar to the lexical of superstratum (dominant lang)  ● Smaller size  ● Re-shaped word forms  POLYSEMY  - Same words expressing meanings  MULTIFUNCTIONALITY    CIRCUMLOCUTION    COMPOUNDING  - To indicate ​abstractions  - To indicate​ gender  REDUPLICATION  - Add meanings of ​intensity; plurality; duration; frequency    9        ORIGINS OF PIDGINS  ● 6 theories, Wardhaugh  1. Theories of independent parallel development  2. Monogenetic theories → 1 common point of origin  3. Linguistic universals → mutualigibility   THEORIES  PARALLEL DEVELOPMENT  MONOGENESIS   LINGUISTIC UNIVERSAL  POLYGENESIS  ● Pidgins from  ● Inherent linguistic    European lang  skills of all humans  - Similar  derived from pidgin  (we share)  circumstances =  Portuguese    social + historical  - Earliest explorers +  BICKERTON’S LANGUAGE  - Similarity of  slave traders  BIOPROGRAM HYPOTHESIS  dominant European  - Formed structural  ● Universal principles  langs   basis - framework  of L1 acquisition  - Similarity of  grammar  ● Similarities  substratum  ● Skeleton  between P+C  languages  framework:  +children’s    adapted by other  language [P+C = 2nd  - Simplification 
More Less

Related notes for LINGUIST 2S03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit