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CA (168,209)
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PSYB45H3 (1,085)
Chapter 25

Chapter 25

2 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB45H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell

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Chapter 25: Cognitive Behaviour Modification
Used to help people change behaviours that are labelled as cognitive
Target behaviour must be identified and defined in objective terms so that its occurrence can be
recorded
True for overt or covert behaviours
Overt behaviours, involves direct observation and recoding of behaviour by an independent
observer or by person exhibiting target behaviour (self-monitoring)
Covert behaviours cannot be observed directly and recorded, so person engaging in cognitive
behaviour must identify and record occurrence of behaviour
Cognitive behaviours: verbal or imaginal responses made by person that are covert. people think,
talk to self, solve problems, evaluate self, make plans, imagine specific behaviours or situations, etc
To be behavioural definition of cognitive behaviour, thought, image, or self-statement must be
described clearly by person engaging in behaviour
Functions of Cognitive Behaviour
Cognitive behaviour may be distressing to person, may function as conditioned stimulus (CS) that
elicits an unpleasant conditioned response (CR)
Cognitive behaviours can also function as discriminative stimuli (SD) for desirable behaviours
May function as establishing operations (EO) that influence power of consequences to function as
reinforcers or punishers
May also be function as reinforcing or punishing consequences when they follow some behaviour ie,
praise statements or critical statements by be reinforcing or punishing
Cognitive Behaviour Modification Procedures
Cognitive restructuring: designed to replace specific maladaptive cognitive behaviours with more
adaptive ones
Cognitive coping skills training: designed to teach new cognitive behaviours needed to cope
effectively with problem situations
oUsed in the case of behavioural deficits- when person does not have the cognitive
behaviours needed to cope effectively with problem situations
Thought refer to cognitive behaviour: thinking, making self-statements, or talking to oneself at
covert level
Cognitive Restructuring
Therapist helps client identify cognitive behaviours that are distressing and then helps client get
rid of distressing thoughts or replace them with more desirable thoughts
Distressing thoughts might be those that elicit emotional responses: fear, anxiety, anger or those
associated with unpleasant moods, problem behaviours or poor performance
3 basic steps:
oHelping client identify the distressing thoughts and situations which they occur. Done by
asking clients to report what distressing thoughts they experience or have client self-
monitor
oHelping client identify the emotional response, unpleasant mood or problem behaviour that
follows the distressing thought. Client can see how distressing thought is an antecedent to
unpleasant emotional response, mood or problem behaviour. Client must report
information from memory or self-monitor
oHelping client stop thinking distressing thoughts by helping client think more rational or
desirable thoughts. When client thinks rational thoughts instead of distressing thoughts,
client is less likely to have negative emotional responses or to engage in problem behaviours
Cognitive therapy
oBurns provides excellent description of cognitive therapy based on work of Beck
o1. getting person to engage in more reinforcing activities
o2. Use cognitive restructuring to help person change his or her distorted thinking
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Description
Chapter 25: Cognitive Behaviour Modification Used to help people change behaviours that are labelled as cognitive Target behaviour must be identified and defined in objective terms so that its occurrence can be recorded True for overt or covert behaviours Overt behaviours, involves direct observation and recoding of behaviour by an independent observer or by person exhibiting target behaviour (self-monitoring) Covert behaviours cannot be observed directly and recorded, so person engaging in cognitive behaviour must identify and record occurrence of behaviour Cognitive behaviours: verbal or imaginal responses made by person that are covert. people think, talk to self, solve problems, evaluate self, make plans, imagine specific behaviours or situations, etc To be behavioural definition of cognitive behaviour, thought, image, or self-statement must be described clearly by person engaging in behaviour Functions of Cognitive Behaviour Cognitive behaviour may be distressing to person, may function as conditioned stimulus (CS) that elicits an unpleasant conditioned response (CR) Cognitive behaviours can also function as discriminative stimuli (SD) for desirable behaviours May function as establishing operations (EO) that influence power of consequences to function as reinforcers or punishers May also be function as reinforcing or punishing consequences when they follow some behaviour ie, praise statements or critical statements by be reinforcing or punishing Cognitive Behaviour Modification Procedures Cognitive restructuring: designed to replace specific maladaptive cognitive behaviours with more adaptive ones Cognitive coping skills training: designed to teach new cognitive behaviours needed to cope effectively with problem situations o Used in t
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