Textbook Notes (368,562)
Canada (161,962)
Psychology (1,978)
PS102 (318)
Chapter 7

PS102 Chapter 7 Detailed Notes

15 Pages
49 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS102
Professor
Kathy Foxall
Semester
Winter

Description
Encoding: Getting Information Into Memory ­ sometimes the information just doesn’t seem important, so you devote little or no attention  to it ­ active encoding is a crcial process in memory The role of attention ­ you need to pay attention to information if you intend to remember it ­ attention involves focusing awareness on a narrowed range of stimuli or events ­ selective attention is critical to everyday functioning ­ attention is often linked to a filter that screens out most potential stimuli while allowing a select few  to pass through conscious awareness ­ it is clear that people have difficulty if they attempt to focus on their attention on 2 or more inputs  simultaneously ­ when participants are forced to divide their attention between memory encoding and some other  task, large reductions in memory performance are seen ­ divided attention can have a negative impact on the performance of quite a variety of tasks,  especially when the tasks are complex or unfamiliar ­ the human brain can effectively handle only one attention­consuming task at a time ­ when people multitask, they are switching back and forth among tasks, rather than processing  them simultaneously ­ while much o the information we want to remember is encoded as a result of effortful processing,  some types of information may be acquired more automatically ­ in the first type of processing, you are picking up information because you are intentionally  attempting to do so, such as when you are listening to your prof ­ other information, such as the frequency of word use is picked up without intending to do so ­ the ability to answer questions based on each type of processing has been found to be a function  of several factors, including circadian patterns and age ­ Focusing awareness ­ Selective attention = selection of input Filtering: early or late? ­ Divided attention Divided Attention Multitasking Impairs performance for: ­ Memory ­ Complex motor skills ­ Attention ­ Driving ­ Learning new skills Levels of Processing: Craik and Lockhart (1972) ­ Incoming information processed at different levels: ­ Deeper processing = longer lasting memory codes ­ attention is critical to the endocing of memories – not all attention is created equal ­ you can attend to things in diferent ways, focusing on different aspects of the stimulus input how people attend to information are the main factors influencing how much they remember ­ in dealing with verbal information, people engage in 3 progressively deeper levels of processing ­ Encoding levels: Structural = shallow that emphasizes the physical structure of the stimulus Phonemic (sound of words) = intermediate, emphasizes what the word sounds like Semantic = deep, emphasizes meaning of verbal input, involves thinking about the objects and the  actions the words represent ­ levels of processing theory proposes that deeper levels of processing result in longer lasting  memory codes Enriching Encoding: Improving Memory ­ Elaboration:  linking a stimulus to other information at the time of encoding Thinking of examples Additional associations created by elaboration usually help people to remember information ­ Visual Imagery: creation of visual images to represent words to be remembered Easier for concrete objects: Dual­coding theory Facilitates memory because it provides a second king of memory code, and two codes are better  than one ­ Dual­coding theory holds that memory is enhanced by forming semantic and visual codes, since  either can lead to recall ­ Self­Referent Encoding: Making information personally meaningful Involves deciding how or whether information is personally relevant Appears to enhance recall by promoting additional elaboration and better organization of  information Storage: Maintaing Information in Memory Plato and Atkinson and Shiffrin 1968 Information­processing theories ­ Subdivides memory into 3 different stores Sensory, Short­term, Long­term Atkinson and Shiffrin Model of Memory Storage Sensory Memory ­ Brief preservation of information in original sensory form ­ allows sensation of a visual pattern, sound, or touch to linger for a brief moment after sensory  stimulation is over ­ Auditory/Visual – approximately ¼ second George Sperling (1960) Classic experiment on visual sensory store (see next page) Short Term Memory (STM) ­ Limited capacity – magical number 7 plus or minus 2 Chunking – grouping familiar stimuli for storage as a single unit ­ Limited duration – about 20 seconds without rehearsal Rehearsal – the process of repetitively verbalizing or thinking about the information In maintenance rehersal you are simply maintaining the information in consciousness, while in  more elaborative processing you are increasing the probability that you will retain the information in  the future ­ STM not limited to phonemic encoding ­ Loss of information not due only to decay ­ Baddeley (1986) – 4 components of working memory Phonological rehearsal loop: at work when you use recitation to temporarily remember something Visuospatial sketchpad: permits people to temporarily hold and manipulate visual images Executive control system: controls the deployment of attention, switching the focus of attention, and  dividing attention as needed Episodic buffer: temporary limited capacity store that allows the various components of working  memory to integrate information and that serves as an interface between working and long term  memory ­ Working memory capacity (WMC) is a limited capacity storage system that temporarily maintains  and stores information by providing an interface between perception, memory, and action influenced by heredity variations influence music ability Long Term Memory: Unlimited Capacity ­ Permanent Storage Flashbulb memories ­ Unusual, shocking, or tragic events may hold a special place in memory ­ Flashbulb memories: characterized by surprise, illumination, and seemingly photographic  detail But even flashbulb memories have errors! Controversy: are STM and LTM really different? ­ Used to think that Phonemic  encoding occurred in STM and Semantic encoding occur in LTM ­ Used to think that decay occurred in STM and  Interference based forgetting took place in LTM Connectionist Networks and Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP) Models ­ Connectionist models of memory take their inspiration from how neural networks appear to  handle information ­ Human brain appears to depend extensively on parallel distributed processing – simultaneous  processing of the same information that is spread across networks of neurons ­ Connectionist or parallel distributed processing (PDP) models assume that cognitive processes  depend on patterns of activation in highly interconnected computational networks that resemble  neural networks ­ A PDP system consists of a large network of interconnected computing units, or nodes, that  operate much like neurons ­ Like an individual neuron, a specific node’s level of activation reflects the weighted balance of  excitatory and inhibitory inputs from many other units ­ PDP models asset that specific memories correspond to particular patterns of activation in  these networks How is Knowledge Represented and Organized in Memory? ­ Clustering (tendency to remember similar or related items in groups) and Conceptual Hierarchies  (multilevel classification system based on common properties among items) ­ Schemas (organized cluster of knowledge about an object from pervious experience with it) and  Scripts ­ Semantic Networks (consists of nodes representing concepts, joined together by pathways that  link related concepts, have been proven useful in explaining why thinking about one work can make  a closely related word easier to remember) Retrieval: Getting Information Out of Memory ­ Using Cues to Aid Retrieval • Tip of the tongue phenomenon is the temporary inability to remember something you  know, accompanied by a feeling that it’s just out of reach • Most people experience this once a week • Memories can often be jogged with retrieval cues – stimuli that help gain access to  memories Reconstructive nature of memory: Misinformation effect ­ Reconstructive errors in eyewitness testimony ­ Terms used in questioning affect recall, e.g. hit vs.  Smashed ­ Misinformation effect still occurs despite warning, happens when participants recall of an event  they witnessed is altered by introducing misleading post­event information ­ Overwriting (Loftus) by new faulty information ­ Others – retrieval of old information Misinformation effects ­ Source and Reality monitoring ­ Making attributions about where the memories come from ­ TV, conversation, real life occurrence, fantasy or thought ­ Source monitoring involves making attributions about origins of memories cruicial facet of memory retrieval that contributes to many of the mistakes people make in  reconstructing their experiences error occurs when a memory derived from one source is misattributed to another source ­ Reality monitoring refers to the process of deciding whether memories are based on external sources (ones  perceptions of actual events) or internal sources (ones thoughts and imaginations) ­ destination memory involves recalling to whom one has told what more fragile because when transmitting information people are self­focused on their message,  leaving less attention capcity to devote to encoding whom one is talking with Forgetting: When Memory Lapses ­ forgetting can reduce competition among memories that can cause confusion may be adaptive in the long run can be caused by defects in encoding, storage, retrieval, or some combination of these processes How quickly we forget: Ebbinghaus’s Forgetting Curve ­ Herman ebbinghaus ­ Forgetting curve graphs retention and forgetting over time ­ Most forgetting occurs very rapidly after learning something
More Less

Related notes for PS102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit