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UTMPSY230H5Ulrich SchimmackFall

Chapter 9: Life outcomes/well-being

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25 Oct 2010
34
Psychologists have studied personality traits and tried to determine whether these traits have an effect on life stories and life outcomes: relationshi
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UTMPSY230H5Ulrich SchimmackFall

Chapter 7: Evolution by natural selection

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25 Oct 2010
34
Changes across generations in levels of characteristics. The variation in personality and physiological traits are unimportant to survival and reproduc
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UTMPSY230H5Ulrich SchimmackFall

PSY230H5 Lecture Notes - Twin Study, Heritability

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25 Oct 2010
33
Pairs of relatives are used in the study; two brothers, a mother a daughter, opposite sexed twins. They fill out a personality questionnaire, or observ
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UTMPSY230H5Ulrich SchimmackFall

PSY230H5 Lecture Notes - Heritability, Twin Study

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25 Oct 2010
21
Galen and hippocrates believed in the 4 humours that were responsible for particular personalities: Blood: causes the sanguine or cheerful temperament.
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UTMPSY230H5Ulrich SchimmackFall

PSY230H5 Lecture Notes - Big Five Personality Traits

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25 Oct 2010
27
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UTMPSY230H5Ulrich SchimmackFall

PSY230H5 Lecture Notes - Trait Theory, Lexical Hypothesis, Factor Analysis

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25 Oct 2010
35
Lexical hypothesis: people will invent words for personality traits that have the largest consequences on their lives. The traits that are important en
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UTMPSY230H5Ulrich SchimmackFall

PSY230H5 Lecture Notes - Trait Theory, Walter Mischel, Femininity

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25 Oct 2010
30
Differences among individuals in a typical tendency to behave, think, or feel in some conceptually related ways, across a variety of relevant situation
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UTMPSY230H5Ulrich SchimmackFall

PSY230H5 Chapter Notes - Chapter 1: Standard Score, Standard Deviation, Negative Number

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25 Oct 2010
52
Introductory pages: what is personality psych? individual differences vs everybody same compare personalities of diff ppl vs. cognitive (basic cognitiv
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Utilitarianism

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11 Oct 2010
24
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Servility and Self-respect Lecture

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11 Oct 2010
23
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Rachel's Lecture

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11 Oct 2010
28
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Plato Lecture

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11 Oct 2010
23
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Peter Singer Lecture Notes

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11 Oct 2010
27
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

John Rawls

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11 Oct 2010
24
Two principles of justice: (conception of the good: equal basic liberties freedom of religion, the second principle divides up into 2 principles (a) fa
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Immanuel Kant

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11 Oct 2010
25
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Immanuel Kant continued…

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11 Oct 2010
31
categorical imperative: i shall never act except in such a way that i can also will that my maxim become a universal law. this is basically saying th
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Hobbes and Rawls

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11 Oct 2010
26
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Hill Servility and Self-respect

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11 Oct 2010
34
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Greater Moral Evil Principle from Hardin

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11 Oct 2010
27
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Alistair Norcross Continued…

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11 Oct 2010
21
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture #9-Concluding Marks

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11 Oct 2010
45
Define concepts and how it relates to social inequality. Not cumulative (only covers things from the midterm forward) statement that we need to argue
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture #8-Mediating Inequality

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11 Oct 2010
34
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture #7-Post-Industrial Inequality (2) – Race and Ethnic Inequality

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11 Oct 2010
33
Post-industrial inequality (2) race and ethnic inequality. Originally racial inequality stemmed from natural sciences to classify and separate individu
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture #6-Post-Industrial Inequality (1) – Gender

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11 Oct 2010
36
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture #5-Inequality Structures – Institutionalism, Ideology, and Hegemony

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11 Oct 2010
36
Video - there are different structures and principles of equality. Later we will talk about how inequality is maintained in our modern society. How ine
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture #4-Functional Theories of Inequality

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11 Oct 2010
33
This theory recognizes that society has become heterogeneous (different). They believe that the complexity of society isn"t a negative feature, and the
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture #3-Social Inequality and Dynamics of Organization

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11 Oct 2010
39
Industry has developed and is taking on new organizational and industrial concepts. individuals are taking on new identities and taking on new profess
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture #2-Industrialization and the Theories of Inequality

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11 Oct 2010
31
Industrial revolution brought about changes within social order. Political and economic movement, whereby landlords/lords would take their little parce
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UTMSOC263H5Paul ArmstrongWinter

Lecture 1-Historical Variations of Inequality

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11 Oct 2010
31
History matters and we matter because men make history. We encounter history as we are born and we cannot control it because we are created in it. Hist
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Summary #4: Plato(Glaucon's Challenge)

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5 Oct 2010
62
In the passage, two characters, plato"s teacher socrates, and plato"s brother glaucon, are engaged in a conversation about the nature and value of just
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Summary #3: Renes Descartes Meditation 1 and 2

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5 Oct 2010
69
Skepticism: this is anyone who challenges our beliefs.  if the belief isn"t certain and have reasons to doubt then you should reject your belief.  it
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Summary #2: Richard Taylor, William Paley, John Hick

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5 Oct 2010
35
Richard taylor (the cosmological argument): he was an american philosopher, he believes that there must be a reason for the existence of everything in
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UTMPHL105Y5Diana RaffmanSummer

Summary #1: Saint Anselm, Gaunilo, William L.Rowe

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5 Oct 2010
32
Something than which nothing greater can be though , then the concept exists within your mind. If the concept can exist within your mind, then it can e
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UTMPSY100Y5Dax UrbszatFall

Ch7-Memory and Cognition

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5 Oct 2010
41
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UTMPSY100Y5Dax UrbszatWinter

Ch13: Health Psychology

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5 Oct 2010
63
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UTMPSY100Y5Dax UrbszatWinter

Ch14: Psychological Disorders

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5 Oct 2010
102
The medical model proposes that it is useful to think of abnormal behavior as a disease. this term is used to refer to many abnormal behaviors such as
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UTMPSY100Y5Dax UrbszatWinter

Chapter 11-Human Development

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5 Oct 2010
77
The germinal stage: it is the first phase of prenatal development, encompassing the first two weeks after conception. Zygote becomes a mass of cells th
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UTMPSY100Y5Dax UrbszatWinter

Chapter 10-Motivation and Emotion

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5 Oct 2010
75
Incentive theories are external goals that have the capacity to motivate our behavior. (example) ice cream, a juicy steak, an a on an exam, approval fr
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UTMPSY100Y5Dax UrbszatFall

Chapter 9- interpreting test results

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5 Oct 2010
51
Psychological test is a standardized measure of a sample of a person"s behavior. They measure individual differences that exist among people in abiliti
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UTMPSY100Y5Dax UrbszatFall

Chapter 8- What are the four key properties of language?

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5 Oct 2010
315
Language is symbolic (people use spoken sounds, written words to represent an object, action, event or an idea). These words are random, although they
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